Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Amphibian Egg Masses

Jasper loves science, so I do my best to find good citizen science projects that we can participate in. This is our third spring doing amphibian egg mass surveys, which we have done in the past for the City of Gresham and for Tualatin Hills Parks and Recreation.  This year we volunteered again for THPR, and surveyed at Spyglass Pond.  The pond is located in the middle of lots of suburban Beaverton housing, and is a reminder that nature will flourish anyplace it's given a chance. We found ample evidence of bullfrogs, which are invasive and especially threaten native red-legged frogs, the focus of our survey.  But we did succeed in finding egg masses from red-legged frogs, as well Pacific chorus frogs.  I circumnavigated the pond in chest waders, counting red-legged frog egg masses, while Jasper tallied them and made notes of the conditions, including the temperature and weather. It's a very pleasant way to spend an hour or so a week, especially when we took our time to observe the egrets, herons, ducks, and beaver and coyote sign. 
Red-legged frog egg mass.
Red-legged frog eggs.
Red-legged frog eggs.
Red-legged frog eggs. The embryos are visible.
Red-legged frog eggs.
Red-legged frog eggs.
Pacific chorus frog eggs.
Pacific chorus frog eggs.
Red-flowering currant.
Indian-plum.

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